Giving Teens a Voice

NYS - Final Summary

 

National Crime Prevention Council
Recommendations
2002 National Youth Summit
on Preventing Violence



 February 16—18, 2002

 



Table of Contents

 

 

Table of Contents....................................................................................................................... 2

Executive Summary................................................................................................................. 3

TRACK 1 - CRIME PREVENTION BASICS.......................................................................... 5

TRACK 2 - SAFE SCHOOLS.................................................................................................. 7

TRACK 3 - ENTERTAINMENT & PREVENTION............................................................... 10

TRACK 4 - COMMUNITY ACTIVISM................................................................................. 14

TRACK 5 - TECHNOLOGY CRIME..................................................................................... 18

TRACK 6 - SUBSTANCE ABUSE......................................................................................... 20

TRACK 7 - MEDIA................................................................................................................. 23

TRACK 8 – POLICY.............................................................................................................. 26

NCPC - Homeland Security Survey.......................................................................................... 31

Homeland Security Recommendations....................................................................................... 44

Policy Recommendations (as delivered to Mr. Christopher Furlow, Homeland Security Office)... 45

Acknowledgements and Credits................................................................................................ 47


Executive Summary

 

            The 2002 National Youth Summit on Preventing Violence was held at the Crystal Gateway Marriott from February 16 – 19, 2002 in Washington, DC. Hosted by the National Crime Prevention Council, youth and adults from 43 states and 5 countries attended to gain knowledge on various issues affecting youth crime today. The Summit’s main goal was to change the perceptions of adults who believe that most young people are perpetrators of crime and this was accomplished in numerous ways throughout the Summit.

 

Thirty-four youth, ages 11-21, from 12 states were selected to be McGruff Ambassadors to help develop policy recommendations in nine crucial areas of concern. The goal of changing the perceptions of young people through powerful policy recommendations was met.  These recommendations address issues concerning terrorism, crime prevention basics, school safety, substance abuse, entertainment and prevention, community activism, media, technology crime, and policy as they relate to violence among youth. Developing these policy recommendations was not an easy task; however, after two days of participating in workshops and roundtable discussions, and visiting non-profit agencies related to the issues, the policy recommendations were completed.

 

The roundtables were most effective because they allowed the youth to discuss their views, perceptions, and ideas on how young people can get involved in the each of the nine track fields of crime prevention. The mega-sessions and off-site visits allowed the young people to get a hands-on experience in each of the nine tracks.  For example, the visits to local non-profit agencies encouraged youth involvement in community service.   This idea was developed as a service learning technique allowing youth to actively participate in change.  The mega-session and off-site visit to the Newseum allowed participants of the media tract to go behind the scenes to see and experience how and why news is made and to participate as newscasters and reporters reliving the greatest news stories of all time.  The technology and preventions session went to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children to see how new technology is used as a tool and resource to solve crimes against children.  They also learned about Internet safety.

 

Teen Think Tanks of America, Incorporated donated their time and state-of-the-art collaborative technology to enhance the process of gathering, reviewing, and developing the policy recommendations. Through a process of facilitated electronic brainstorming and utilizing a consensus model and collaborative group-decision technology, the 34 Ambassadors were able to capture their thoughts and ideas quickly into an electronic database. They input their problem statements related to each issue, barrier statements on why the problem exists, and then developed solution statements on how the problem can be solved. Once each track group completed inputting this information, policy recommendations were developed. Jim Copple, Vice-President and Chief Operating Officer of the National Crime Prevention Council offered the teens assistance as each track team developed their policy recommendations.  He also provided a wealth of resource information and was able to offer the teens some guidance in the process of developing the recommendations.

 

            This report presents many recommendations made to the local, state, and federal governments. The primary problem concerning young people today is that they feel that they are not given an opportunity to voice their concerns about their future and truly be heard. The youth voice of today is concerned about issues of new policies being implemented by the various governments that affect youth such as media attention and the regulations placed on the media as well as the entire entertainment industry and the images portrayed and targeted toward young people. Other concerns expressed by the youth include the need for training of young people to deal with issues of terrorism, substance abuse, and peer pressure. In addition young people want to become more involved in their communities and want to have law enforcement and government agencies support through funding for programs, staff to facilitate programs, and technical support to maintain the programs.

 

    Another area of great concern is school safety.  Beginning with the various school shootings and the media attention placed on those events, students have become more concerned for their personal safety and the safety of others in and around schools.  Since September 11, 2001 even more fear and emphasis has been placed on school safety and security. Youth want to establish safety and security programs, task forces, and networks for youth, policy makers, parents, business professional and others to help keep the schools safe.

 

     According to Anwar el-Sadat,   “Fear is … a most effective tool in destroying the soul of an individual—and the soul of a people.”  Giving in to fear is giving into terrorism.  We cannot prepare for our futures while living in constant fear.  Part of the preparations involves equipping our nation’s youth with the requisite skills for making our homes, schools, and communities safe.   The Summit Ambassadors, in association with Teen Think Tanks of America, Incorporated, developed twelve proactive initiatives that young people can do in their communities to combat or deal with fear, panic, uncertainty, and confusion related to terrorism.  These directives were submitted to and validated by the participants at the Summit and delivered to the Office of Homeland Security. While many of the directives focus on how schools, communities, and youth can work together, government support is needed. One of the most crucial directives developed was that schools and community-based organizations will encourage the establishment of discussion groups utilizing highly experienced professionals to educate teens on issues surrounding terrorism in America.  While this is just one example of how young people, communities, schools, adults, and parents, as well as local, state, and federal governments can be proactive and work together, the complete report discusses this example and many more in detail.

 

            At the conclusion of the 2002 National Youth Summit on Preventing Violence, the McGruff Ambassadors read the policy recommendations and the twelve Homeland Security directives to approximately 1,200 participants of the Youth United for a Stronger America March and Rally at Pentagon City Mall. The march and rally proved that young people are doing positive things in their communities.  

 

     The Summit brought us together; the march gave us a stand; the rally gave us a voice; we are the most valuable untapped resource in America.  It is our challenge to you, our elected officials to lead by example and act upon our recommendations.

 

 

 

 

Hamilton Sneed

2002 Summit Youth Chair

National Youth Summit on Preventing Violence


 

TRACK 1 - CRIME PREVENTION BASICS

 

1.1.   Problem Statement

 

Some law enforcement elements in rare but unacceptable instances have been known to violate the civil rights of youth, playing on their ignorance as to the law and their Constitutional rights.

 

1.1.1 Barrier Statement

 

Many youth are neither aware nor assertive enough to react appropriately to violations of their rights.

 

1.1.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Establish education programs to inform youth concerning their rights and responsibilities when interacting with police.

 

1.2 Problem Statement

 

Youth have a negative perception of police.

 

1.2.1 Barrier Statement

 

Youth do not interact with police in ways that allow the teens to understand the motivation for police actions and do not realize that the officers are normal people like them, only doing a job. 

 

Rationale:

Youth and police have not interacted in positive ways that allow the teens to understand the motivation for police actions and enable the police to understand the motivation of teens.

 

1.2.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Federal, state, and local guidelines will provide opportunities for youth and police to interact in social activities, friendly open discussions, and police sponsored educational assemblies in schools and communities, focusing on motivations for police actions and explanations of officer safety precautions that emphasize their human element.

 

1.2.2 Barrier Statement

 

Problems concerning officers in police departments throughout the country have recently come into the focus of the public. Officers' misconduct, such as "jump outs" where officers detain a number of youth without reasonable evidence or probable cause, are seeding distrust and contempt for officers of the law, which is detrimental to the essential cooperation between the two groups.

 

1.2.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Agencies throughout the United States will establish a national standard requiring a minimum of 3 credit hours of training in communication skills and an additional 3 hours in teen psychology.

 

1.3 Problem Statement

 

Youth feel that their opinions and needs are placed as secondary and subservient to those of adults by law enforcement.

 

1.3.1 Barrier Statement

 

Because adult members of the community are considered to be in more powerful positions, due to their abilities to vote and their greater vocal presence, youth tend to hold back their information about crime and violence in their communities, failing to aggressively make their voices heard and understood. Therefore youth input is seldom taken into consideration.

 

1.3.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Federal, state, and local agencies need to develop programs that enable youth to expand their involvement and contact with media, their most potent tool to make their voices heard. Youth need to be educated concerning the power of their voices and how to make their voices heard.  They also need to be sure that they establish a relationship with police that is reciprocal. Youth must be respectful, cooperative, and positive to gain the respect of police and to assert teens' value and input with the system.

 

1.4 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Elected officials in federal, state, and local agencies will develop training initiatives to support positive interaction between law enforcement and youth.


TRACK 2 - SAFE SCHOOLS

 

2.1 Problem Statement

 

School Resource Officers (SRO) along with other security guards and counselors are rarely trained to counsel students.

 

Rationale:

Many students feel safer and more comfortable talking with SROs.  Therefore, schools need more trained counselors and SROs who are understanding, caring, and relatable who can be available to work one-on-one with the children.  

 

2.1.1 Barrier Statement

 

SROs are viewed as disciplinary police rather than adults that students can go to for comfort, support, and guidance.  

 

2.1.1.1 Solution

 

The SROs need to earn and maintain positive images by interacting with the students and by showing more personal interest in students’ lives.

 

2.1.2 Barrier Statements

 

The SROs are not trained as counselors to instruct and guide students.

 

                   2.1.2.1 Solution Statement

 

       SROs must be required to complete a specific number of psychology, sociology, and

       other appropriate counseling classes to prepare them for work in the schools.

 

2.1.3 Barrier Statement

 

SROs are not trained to explain their programs to faculty, administration, and students to optimize the effectiveness of the program.

 

2.1.3.1 Solution Statements

 

SROs will to be trained to fully understand their roles within the schools and to learn to positively express their roles to the administration, faculty and students.

 

2.2 Problem Statement

Few students feel that their administrators, teachers, and counselors understand them.  Therefore, under threatening circumstances, students are unlikely to go to the appropriate authorities when problems arise.

 

2.2.1 Barrier Statement

 

Communication most often flows from teachers to students.  Students do not feel comfortable enough with their teachers to go to them for help.

 

2.2.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Students need to fill out evaluations on teachers at the end of the year at the same time that teachers are filling out evaluations on the students.  These evaluations should then be used to help find ways to improve teaching style.

 

2.2.2 Barrier Statement

 

Mutual mistrust has led to a significant lack of communication between the students, parents, administrators, and the community. 

 

2.2.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Joint community service projects that include all involved parties would encourage positive interaction, thus building stronger interpersonal relationships outside of the school setting.

 

2.2.3 Barrier Statement

 

Lack of communication has a direct affect on community involvement in schools, leaving multitudes of untapped resources.

 

2.2.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Town hall meetings should be held regularly to encourage community awareness and community involvement.  All members of the school district and community should be encouraged to attend in order to discuss solutions to the current problems.

 

2.3 Problem Statement

 

Policy makers are not dedicating enough resources to school safety issues.

 

2.3.1 Barrier Statement

 

Often budgetary decisions are focused on providing funding for highly visible but often unnecessary items, such as new professional-level sports stadiums when in fact, books and security guards are more desperately needed.

 

2.3.1.1 Solution Statement

Convene a committee that includes representatives from business, community, law enforcement, emergency services, school administration, parents and students to prioritize school safety funding decisions.

 

2.3.2 Barrier Statement

 

School District funding priorities often lack sufficient resources for school safety programs. 

 

2.3.2.1 Solution Statement

 

School districts must develop new and long-term streams of funding sources for school safety programs.

 

2.3.3 Barrier Statement

 

Policy makers and legislators are sometimes oblivious to the financial needs of school districts, particularly as they relate to school safety programs.

 

2.3.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Encourage legislators to make direct contact with schools to include on-site visitations and the development of student advisory councils to identify and prioritize school safety funding issues.

 

2.3.4 Barrier Statement

 

School funding requests are long-delayed and convoluted processes.  Upon approval, schools find themselves waiting extensive periods, thus receiving the funds long after the initial requests and sometimes after completion of the project for which funds were necessary.

 

2.3.4.1 Solution Statement

 

While it is understood that policy is very important and must be treated with the deepest responsibility, school funding recommendations should be recognized as a high priority.

 

2.4 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

 Local, state, and federal agencies will develop and provide resources to implement school security and safety programs that are established around a network of trust developed among youth, policy makers, law enforcement officials, business professionals, and other adults.

 


TRACK 3 - ENTERTAINMENT & PREVENTION

 

3.1 Problem Statement

 

When youth are exposed to violence, hatred, and death through their favorite types of entertainment, their minds observe and absorb these negative ideas as acceptable.

 

Rationale

Youth are like sponges; they learn by observing, absorbing, and imitating. The typical American child witnesses approximately 8,000 murders and 200,000 other acts of violence on television and in the movies. Powerful images are incorporated into their lives in the form of violent movies, television shows, video games, music videos, and local news shows.

 

3.1.1 Barrier Statement

 

The media, movies, and television are addictive to youth so much that they cannot separate reality from fiction.

 

Illustration

For example, there are youth that create wrestling federations in their backyards. This sometimes causes youth to receive severe injuries, because they were modeling themselves after the wrestlers they saw on television.

 

3.1.1.1 Solution Statement

 

To reverse the damage done by the media, community and faith-based organizations must create positive entertainment in which youth can participate so that they can understand the right thing to do when they are faced with any situation.

 

Rationale

 

Programs that build self-confidence, pride, and moral systems help youth make good decisions.

 

3.1.2 Barrier Statement

 

Youth feel that the media is sending out a message on how youth should maintain a certain image.

 

Rationale

 

Criminals, drug dealers, and images and messages in music videos are glorified. It cons individuals into believing that smoking, selling drugs, drinking beer, and hanging out is the way to obtain the "ideal" way of life.

 

 

3.1.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Drug prevention programs like D.A.R.E. that teach young children about the dangers of drug use must be expanded.  Similar programs dealing with conflict resolution and gang prevention need to be established in schools and communities where they do not exist.  These programs alter youth perception of criminal activity and counteract the influence of negative entertainment.

 

3.1.3 Barrier Statement

 

Children are increasingly being raised in isolation from human contact.

 

Rationale

 

We are turning the task of occupying ourselves over to electronic devices, from television programs to electronic games. To the extent that we eliminate human interactions, we are reducing the chances that we will learn what it means to be fully human.

 

3.1.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Parents can limit the amount of time children spend watching television, and encourage children to spend their time on sports, hobbies, or with friends; parents and kids can even draw up a list of other enjoyable activities to do instead of watching television.

 

3.1.4 Barrier Statement

 

Children from ages six to eight begin to confuse real life and television, a dangerous illusion.

 

Rationale:

 

Even cartoons on television often contain violent content. One monitoring organization measured forty-eight violent acts an hour in a Bugs Bunny show. Adult programs averaged about thirty-eight violent acts an hour.

 

3.1.4.1 Solution Statement

 

Because there is a great deal of violence in both adult and children's programming, parents must limit the number of hours children watch television in an effort to reduce the amount of aggression children see.

 

Rationale:

 

While most scientists are convinced that children can learn aggressive behavior from television, they also point out that parents have tremendous power to moderate that influence.

 

3.2 Problem Statement

 

Violent crimes that are committed by juveniles occur most often between the hours of 3:00 P.M. and 6:00 P.M., coinciding with the end of the school day and the early evening. Free time becomes the prime opportunity for young people to get into trouble.

 

 

3.2.1 Barrier Statement

 

The cost for after-school programs can range from $50,000 to $500,000 a year, depending on the number of students served and the kind of services offered.

 

Rationale:

 

Parent fees are often the main financial support for programs. Unfortunately, fewer programs are available to low income youths who may have the greatest need for them. Many programs are burdened by the lack of resources and trained staff, which is common in a field where salaries average less than $10 an hour, and turnover rates are about 40 percent a year.

 

3.2.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Since most school budgets are already strained, program developers must turn to the community to tap into a wide range of funding. These can include federal and state grants, city money, foundation grants, business contributions and community fund raising.

 

3.3 Problem Statement

 

After school, many youth go to an empty house, where they are unsupervised and neglected. This is a beginning for youth to develop negative emotions and shy away from interaction at school since there is no real interaction at home.

 

 3.3.1 Barrier Statement

 

Children of single-parent and two-parent families are often at home, unsupervised and neglected, because their parents have to work two or three jobs and have no time to be at home with them.

 

3.3.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Establish mentoring programs that can provide these children with alternative opportunities, skills, and rewards.

 

Rationale:

 

Mentors note that one of the greatest benefits of the mentoring program is that it provides children with a safe place to be after school.

3.3.2 Barrier Statement

 

There is a high teen pregnancy rate due to sexually charged popular culture. When kids are having kids, an unhealthy environment is created for a child to develop. 

 

3.3.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Mentoring programs and other extra curricular activities foster responsibility, self- confidence, self-control, emotional control, mental toughness, determination, leadership, trust, and superior decision making skills.

 

3.4 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Local, state, and federal agencies must fund youth programs and extracurricular activities that create a positive environment for youth to develop. This will provide the resources and encouragement that young minds need so that they can evolve and develop into well-adjusted, law-abiding citizens.

 

3.5 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

The federal government must create stronger restrictions for distributors of entertainment containing explicit lyrics, violent ideas, and derogatory language. This prevents impressionable minds from having their judgement obscured by these unpleasant and unrealistic depictions of life.

 


TRACK 4 - COMMUNITY ACTIVISM

 

4.1 Problem Statement

 

Drugs are readily available for teenagers.

 

4.1.1 Barrier Statement

 

Schools lack a sufficient number of law enforcement officers to effectively implement school drug enforcement policies.

 

4.1.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Local, state, and federal law enforcement agencies must increase the number of police officers dedicated to on-site school drug prevention and education programs.

 

4.1.2 Barrier Statement

 

Youth lack awareness of the broad spectrum of the effects of drug use.

 

4.1.2.1 Solution Statement

 

There must be an increased number of programs in direct relation to the societies' needs.  The intensity of programs should differ from one school to another according to their statistics on drug use.

 

4.1.3 Barrier Statement

 

Parents are not involved in the fight against drugs in public schools.

 

4.1.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Local school districts must create open forums that encourage communications between parents and children pertaining to drug usage.

 

4.1.4 Barrier Statement

 

Youth take drugs due to boredom.

 

4.1.4.1 Solution Statement

 

School and community agencies must increase the availability of positive and motivational after-school activities.


4.2 Problem Statement

 

Teenagers are apathetic towards community activism.

 

4.2.1 Barrier Statement

 

Community programs fail to effectively communicate service opportunities to youth.

 

4.2.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Community agencies must utilize youth in the organizational process of developing service projects.

 

4.2.2 Barrier Statement

 

Youth are not motivated to get involved in community activism programs.

 

4.2.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Youth must be informed and encouraged to realize the potential importance and impact they have on community affairs.

 

4.2.3 Barrier Statement

 

Youth lack positive role models within their communities.

 

4.2.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Local agencies and schools shall identify and recognize positive youth and adult role models.

 

4.2.4 Barrier Statement

 

Youth lack knowledge of community involvement opportunities.

 

4.2.4.1 Solution Statement

 

Local agencies and schools must educate youth on opportunities to serve their communities

 

4.3 Problem Statement

 

Lack of government involvement in grass roots youth projects.

 

4.3.1 Barrier Statement

 

There is a lack of communication between government agencies and youth.

 

4.3.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Local governments shall establish youth councils to participate in community meetings and policy making.

 

4.3.2 Barrier Statement

 

Local, state, and federal governmental agencies fail to include appropriations for youth service activities.

 

4.3.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Youth and youth advocates must lobby for changes in public policies.

 

4.3.3 Barrier Statement

 

There is a lack of resources (the people, tools, etc.) within communities to recruit and assist you with service projects.

 

4.3.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Youth and youth advocates must become more vocal in the community to reach individuals who could provide time and resources.

 

 

4.3.4 Barrier Statement

 

Government officials are apathetic toward the ideas and concerns of youth.

 

4.3.4.1 Solution Statement

Youth and youth advocates must market their ideas to government agencies and help them realize the importance of the input and engagement of youth.

 

4.4 Problem Statement

 

Teenage pregnancy is increasing at a rapid rate among younger children.

 

4.4.1 Barrier Statement

 

Most teens indicate there is a strong lack of parental involvement and advice concerning teenage pregnancy.

 

4.4.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Increase parental education on the issue of teenage pregnancy and add more training in public schools to advise parents.

 

4.4.2 Barrier Statement

 

Students indicate that there is a definite lack of education on preventing pregnancy and how to care for a child in public schools.

 

4.4.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Increased the quantity and quality of public programs aimed at preventing teen pregnancy.

 

4.4.3 Barrier Statement

 

Peer pressure is a factor in the increase of sexual activity.

 

4.4.3.1 Solution Statement

 

An increased awareness of children in schools about the impact of peer pressure, as well as the detrimental affects of forcing a child to partake in sexual activities.

 

4.4.4 Barrier Statement

 

Schools do not offer free birth control and/or protection to teens that are sexually active.

 

4.4.4.1 Solution Statement

 

Schools and community-based organizations must appropriate funds to provide youth with educational and emotional resources and protection against STD's, AIDS and other diseases.

 

4.5 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Local, state, and federal agencies must provide resources to develop new and support existing community action programs that encourage youth and adult collaborations.

4.6 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Local, State and Federal government must develop public awareness programs that encourage community activism at the grass roots level.  These programs must be structured such that activism becomes a way of life.


TRACK 5 - TECHNOLOGY CRIME

 

5.1 Problem Statement

 

The Internet has become an easy and often untraceable resource for identity theft.

 

5.1.1 Barrier Statement

 

The users control the information that is placed in the database of personal profiles over the internet, allowing them to portray people that they are not.

 

5.1.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Internet providers will control the information contained in personal profiles by setting up profiles that can only be changed by the Internet provider based on the information given to set up the account.

 

5.1.2 Barrier Statement

 

Different profiles can be created under one account.

 

5.1.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Screen names under the main account will be unable to set up profiles.

 

5.1.3 Barrier Statement

 

The ability to download free software, containing instant messaging features, without proof of identity, allows users to create false personas which can be accessed by other users.

 

5.1.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Users will be unable to create instant messaging accounts with Internet servers that they do not hold their accounts. Screen names under the main account will not be able to set up instant messaging accounts. 

 

5.2 Problem Statement

 

Unrestricted Internet use allows access to inappropriate material by minors.

 

5.2.1 Barrier Statement

 

Not all Internet providers contain parental control options to prevent the viewing of inappropriate materials by minors.

 

 

5.2.1.1 Solution Statement

 

All Internet providers will be required to contain parental control options issued by the Federal Government to stop minors from viewing inappropriate material.

 

5.2.2 Barrier Statement

 

Minors can access inappropriate materials through their e-mail accounts by receiving targeted documents.

 

Rationale:

 

Targeted documents are documents sent by an unknown user to a personal account. The unknown user can obtain an e-mail address through chat rooms. 

 

5.2.2.1 Solution Statement

 

There should be a difference in the e-mail address and the screen name. Screen names should not be the same as their corresponding e-mail addresses.

 

5.2.3 Barrier Statement

 

Internet providers that do not contain parental controls allow minors to access inappropriate material contained on websites without the viewer's knowledge.

 

5.2.3.1 Solution Statement

 

A regulated rating system of all websites will be implemented to give viewer's an idea of what they are about to view.

 

5.3 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

To eliminate the amount of false identification that is portrayed over the Internet, federal, state, and local governments will establish strict policies to eliminate the opportunities for people to create an alternate persona for themselves. These policies will be congruent with each other.

5.4 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Federal, state, and local governments will establish appropriate regulations by which Internet providers must abide when creating programs that are available to consumers.

 


TRACK 6 - SUBSTANCE ABUSE

 

6.1 Problem Statement

 

Illegal substances are readily available to minors on black markets and through unlawful merchant sales.

 

6.1.1 Barrier Statement

 

The legal system does not enforce consequences for lawbreaking merchants and black market salesman

 

6.1.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Hold businesses accountable for enforcing regulations that currently exist and make law enforcement officers enforce these rules.

 

6.1.2 Barrier Statement

 

No enforced punishment in place to make parents responsible when they are caught aiding youth in obtaining illegal substances.

 

6.1.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Hold parents accountable when they are responsible for obtaining legal substances that are illegal for minors.

 

6.1.3 Barrier Statement

 

There is a lack of educational programs pertaining to the dangers of abuse and misuse of illegal substances

 

6.1.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Create PSAs and programs that target teens to educate them on topics that are relevant to substance abuse.

 

6.2 Problem Statement

 

The media portrays the use of illegal substances as glamorous.

 

6.2.1 Barrier Statement

 

Movies and television make it fashionable and trendy to smoke, drink and use drugs illegally.

 

 

6.2.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Movies and television should be banned from portraying tobacco, alcohols, and drug use fashionable through any medium.

 

6.2.2 Barrier Statement

 

Media does not accurately depict the dangers and long-term effects of substance abuse.

 

6.2.2.1  Solution Statement

 

Government officials should mandate that the media portrays substance abuse realistically which includes information about long-term effects of abuse.

 

6.2.3 Barrier Statement

 

Celebrities portray figures without morals and values causing youth to emulate them and think that these behaviors are acceptable.

 

6.2.3.1    Solution Statement

 

Celebrities must be encouraged to deliver public service messages about the dangers of immoral and illegal behaviors.

 

 

6.3 Problem Statement

 

The opportunity is too large for youths to use illegal substances.

 

6.3.1 Barrier Statement

 

Schools are not punishing students effectively and maintaining discipline among substance users at school and on campus.

 

                        6.3.1.1  Solution Statement

 

Schools must take a stronger stance on substance abuse, particularly at school, and punish students to the fullest extent.

 

6.3.2 Barrier Statement

 

There is an abundance of time between when schools let out and when parents arrive home.

 

                  6.3.2.1  Solution Statement

 

Parents who cannot be home with their students after school should find after-school care or age-appropriate after-school activities for their children.

 

6.4 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

State
and Federal agencies will provide programs that are hard hitting and relevant to youthful generation and will affect them by making them aware of the dangers of abusing illegal substances.

6.5 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Local agencies will create programs that reward youth who are take the initiative to educate their peers on the dangers of substance abuse and continue to make a difference and create opportunities to aid them so they may continue on larger scales.

 


TRACK 7 - MEDIA

 

7.1 Problem Statement

 

The media portrays youth as perpetrators of crime; however, media crime coverage has increased  83% while real crime rates have fallen 20%.

 

7.1.1 Barrier Statement

 

The crime rate of youth is down while the percentage of airtime given to negative youth stories is up.

 

7.1.1.1 Solution Statement

 

The establishment of positive youth TV shows and radio stations will give young people an opportunity to be heard 

 

7.1.2 Barrier Statement

 

Most headlines degrade youth in order to gain attention of the reader

 

7.1.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Boycott the newspapers that do not properly portray the essence of the youth today

 

7.1.3 Barrier Statement

 

Youth do not receive the positive recognition they deserve from the community or the media

 

7.1.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Establish a National Youth Day that will recognize the accomplishments of outstanding youth

 

7.2 Problem Statement

 

The community is not properly equipped with the knowledge of media activism, which has been proven to lead uneducated youth to become more violent.

 

7.2.1 Barrier Statement

 

Media is capable of manipulating youth through advertisements, music, video games, and movies

 

7.2.1.1 Solution Statement

Require media literacy classes in schools for all ages.

7.2.2 Barrier Statement

 

Youth are not properly educated on media activism

 

7.2.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Require media literacy education

 

7.2.3 Barrier Statement

 

The reason that positive images are not displayed on National and International media is because those images have problems getting to those media communities

 

7.2.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Micro-media is a way for the youth and communities to get a positive image to the media.

 

7.2.4 Barrier Statement

 

Macro-media is a larger organization that focuses on national news

 

7.2.4.1 Solution Statement

 

Micro-media is the usage of smaller media outlets to get a more positive point across.

 

7.3 Problem Statement

 

Youth Programs and conventions lack the money to send participants and to have successful programs

 

7.3.1 Barrier Statement

 

Programs that do not have a large budget and high visibility usually are not well publicized in the media.

 

7.3.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Require government subsidies to support youth programs.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.4 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Congress must propose to expand the National Youth Service Day to recognize all outstanding youth of
America. We will particularly recognize those youth who are sending positive messages throughout their schools, communities, and states. This day will shift the perception of youth as perpetrators of crime to the reality that youth are a positive force for crime prevention.

7.5
POLICY RECOMMENDATION

All 50 states and
US territories need to require media literacy at the state level to teach how to understand a media message.  Currently only 8 states require teaching media literacy; requiring this in all states and teaching youth at a young age will help to stop the media's control mass control of our nation’s youth.

 


TRACK 8 – POLICY

 

Involving youth in their communities and in the forming of public policy is imperative.  Youth feel that policy regarding youth cannot be appropriately formed without the consultation of youth, through youth and adult partnerships.

 

8.1 Problem Statement

 

Youth feel that they do not have a say in the formation of public policy.

 

8.1.1 Barrier Statement

 

Youth do not know the procedures of contacting and working with their legislators.

 

8.1.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Schools should create opportunities to educate youth in the process of public policy and law making by creating service programs that will allow them to work on political campaigns, participate in local government meetings that support their causes, and to serve on boards as decision makers or process observers.

 

8.1.2 Barrier Statement

 

Legislators do not feel the responsibility to work with teens and don't value their inputs as resources.

 

8.1.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Law makers will organize teen advisory boards within their constituencies with whom they can confer for input on legislation that affects youth.

 

8.1.3 Barrier Statement

 

Youth are apathetic because they feel that their opinions do not matter.

 

8.1.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Youth need to see policy in action-- they feel the need to see the fruits of their labor, not just legislation on paper.

 

8.1.4 Barrier Statement

 

Youth are not effectively showing legislators that they do have opinions on the policies that affect them.

 

 

 

8.1.4.1 Solution Statement

 

Local, state, and federal legislative offices can implement the use of designated staff members to serve as youth-to-adult liaisons that deal directly with the youth constituency under their jurisdiction.  These liaisons will work directly with the youth by conferring with organized teen policy advisory boards that will provide recommendations and input into youth-related public policies.

 

8.2 Problem Statement

 

Youth are ready to change public policies; however they are uneducated when it comes to public policies.

 

8.2.1 Barrier Statement

 

There is limited access of materials available to youth locally concerning public policies.

 

8.2.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Schools as well as libraries need to work with officials in getting easy to understand materials concerning these policies.

 

8.2.2 Barrier Statement

 

Youth have found there is a lack of education about ways they can change public policy.

 

8.2.2.1 Solution Statement

 

The youth need policy courses in schools that will teach them how to go about changing policies.

 

8.2.3 Barrier Statement

 

The youth are seriously in the dark concerning who their policy makers are and any pertinent information in regards to contacting them.

 

8.2.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Legislatures in each state will develop a booklet that will include contact information specific to their state, county, and/or city jurisdictions that will serve as resources in schools and libraries for youth.

 

8.2.4 Barrier Statement

 

Youth do not have personal contacts with many individuals that deal with public policies.

 

 

8.2.4.1 Solution Statement

 

Mentor programs will be established and offered to youth by local, state, and federal legislators in their individual jurisdictions to develop relationships between professional policy makers and students.

 

8.3 Problem Statement

 

Youth feel that the budget cuts will influence social change.

 

8.3.1 Barrier Statement

 

Because of budget cuts, youth education is suffering.

 

8.3.1.1 Solution Statement

 

Offer more scholarships to educate students to become qualified educators and also encourage more people to enter the education field.

 

8.3.1.2 Solution Statement

 

If we hire more teachers, guidance counselors, principals and staff alike, we will be able to focus on the student as individuals instead of the class as a group. 

 

8.3.1.3 Solution Statement

 

Properly funding our schools will better educate our youth. They will be exposed to better technology, newer, updated textbooks, teachers who WANT to teach and students who are ready and willing to learn.

 

8.3.2 Barrier Statement

 

Students want to successfully complete school and often use summer school programs to accomplish this goal, but because of budget cuts this program will be cut in many states.

 

8.3.2.1 Solution Statement

 

Offer more programs to keep youth off the streets and still give them a chance to  be educated in other fields.

 

8.3.2.2 Solution Statement

 

If it is impossible to bring back summer programs, work with business leaders to set up work-study programs and allow students to gain hands-on training and experience in a particular field.

 

 

 

8.3.3 Barrier Statement

 

Budget cuts in programs that receive federal monies will not be able to extend their services to youth who really need them.

 

8.3.3.1 Solution Statement

 

Major cuts should not be made in education or federal programs that service youth; one compliments the other and if they both are unable to function effectively that will result in chaos amongst youth. To do so will raise the crime and dropout rate, as well as increase drug use among teens.  It will also add to having direct monies focused on once again trying to "patch" the solution when all along it could have been prevented.

 

 

Rationale:

 

Education is the key to prevention, NOT more jails.  If we can focus on educating youth through school and youth programs the need for jails will be eliminated. 

 

8.3.4 Barrier Statement

 

Programs that educate youth on various issues are also suffering.

 

8.3.4.1 Solution Statement

 

Allow these programs to continue to function with their previous budgets. This will allow them to still educate the same number of youth, instead of only being able to reach half.

 


8.4 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Schools should create opportunities to educate youth in the process of public policy and law making by creating service programs that will allow them to work on political campaigns, participate in local government meetings that support their causes, and to serve on boards as decision makers or process observers.

8.5 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Local, state, and federal legislative offices can implement the use of designated staff members to serve as youth-to-adult liaisons that deal directly with the youth constituency under their jurisdiction.  These liaisons will work directly with the youth by conferring with organized teen policy advisory boards that will provide recommendations and input into youth-related public policies.

8.6 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Legislatures in each state will develop a booklet that will include contact information specific to their state, county, and/or city jurisdictions that will serve as resources in schools and libraries for youth.

8.7 POLICY RECOMMENDATION

Mentor programs will be established and offered to youth by local, state and federal legislators in their individual jurisdictions to develop relationships between professional policy makers and students.

 


NCPC - Homeland Security Survey

Validation of brainstorming results by McGruff Ambassadors

 

 

 

 

 

 

Facilitator’s Note: The eight tracks preceding this section represent issues that were brought forward from the prior year’s summit. However, in light of the events of September 11, 2001, the McGruff Ambassadors decided to address the issue of domestic terrorism/homeland security. Toward that goal, Teen Think Tanks of America, Inc. established an impromptu electronic brainstorming session to allow the ambassadors to identify those actions that could be accomplished by teens in their communities that would cause their homes and communities to be safer and more secure. In thirty minutes, the 34 ambassadors generated 68 possible teen-based home safety and security initiatives. Then they used a consensus model and group decision technique to select their best and most promising ideas. Their top 10 ideas were then converted into an electronic survey that was administered to the other attendees at the summit during a group entertainment event. Each respondent was asked to indicate the extent to which he or she agreed or disagreed with each of the proposed youth-based initiatives. The results of this survey are shown below. Although the sample is small due to the need to complete the survey quickly, it did validate the original findings and recommendations made earlier by the McGruff Ambassadors.

It is interesting to note that the entire process of brainstorming, prioritization, survey development, survey administration, and producing the results were all accomplished in less than 5 hours.

 

Validation Survey Results

 

The survey questionnaire consists of 10 declarative statements and one open-ended discussion question. The declarative statements were the top 10 actions that resulted from the brainstorming session by the McGruff Ambassadors. The respondents could choose from five responses: SA – Strongly Agree; A- Agree;  N- Neutral; D – Disagree; or SD – Strongly Disagree.  The results appear on the following pages.


Survey Results

 

1.      Develop education programs for all levels that give in-depth knowledge of terrorism...this will allow youth to have a better understanding of what they'll dealing with.

 

                                                                                                                        Rating: Strongly Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   SA(3.50)

Mode                                                   SA

STD                                                     0.54

 


2.      Develop programs that foster patriotism and encourage youth to participate in positive community service projects.

                                                                                                      Rating: Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   A(3.37)

Mode                                                   A

STD                                                     0.62

 

 

 


3.      All schools in America should develop their own security councils that include students, teachers, administrators and parents to establish anti-terrorism policies and methods for making the school community safe.
                                                                                                                        Rating: Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   A(3.29)

Mode                                                   SA

STD                                                     0.84

 

 

 


 

4.     Schools should host regular awareness sessions for community members and youth that are directed toward educating the public about the changes happening in their state and nation regarding homeland security.
                                                                                                                        Rating: Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   A(3.19)

Mode                                                   A

STD                                                     0.62

 

 


5.      Encourage the media to concentrate on reporting positive things going on in the nation, such as positive human interest stories to uplift people spirits. 

 

                                                                                                                              Rating: Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   A(3.49)

Mode                                                   SA

STD                                                     0.69

 

 

 


 

6.      Encourage families to focus on the basics of safety, patriotism and family values.

 

                                                                                                                              Rating: Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   A(3.47)

Mode                                                   SA

STD                                                     0.58

 

 


7.      Create Student Support Groups that include trusted and caring adults to help deal with the threat of terrorism.  

                                                                                                                              Rating: Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   A(3.23)

Mode                                                   SA

STD                                                     0.78

 

 

 


 

8.      Establish discussion groups with highly experienced facilitators to educate teens on issues surrounding terrorism in America.

                                                                                                           Rating: Strongly Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   A(3.32)

Mode                                                   A

STD                                                     0.63

 


9.      Create peer education groups that focus on terrorism and how to deal with it.

 

                                                                                                                        Rating: Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   A(3.28)

Mode                                                   A

STD                                                     0.70

 

 

 


 

10.  Create programs for high school students to mentor younger students on       how to understand and cope with the threat of terrorism.

 

                                                                                                           Rating: Strongly Agree

 

Ballot Description:   SA-Strongly Agree   A-Agree   D-Disagree   SD-Strongly Disagree

 

Statistics

Mean                                                   A(3.45)

Mode                                                   SA

STD                                                     0.67

 

 


11.  Do you have any other suggestions for youth-initiative action items to make our homes and communities safer and more secure?

 

  1. I think we should focus on knowing other races beside our own to better ourselves and our nation!
  2. Youth need a better understanding of the different cultural backgrounds here in the U.S.  There also needs to be a support group for the people who are personally attacked because of their race.  Such as those of the Muslim community who were attacked based on their race.  These individual youth were treated badly and need support groups as well as those of us who experienced the attacks personally.
  3. I think that for all students, the idea of a mentor program for all the younger kids is a great idea!
  4. I think that children at a young age should be educated on the dangers of guns and other weapons this will solve two things reduce gun accidents and begin their awareness of the dangers around them
  5. We need to make sure that younger kids aren't scared and understand what’s happening around them so they can be kids and help prevent it in the future and also help raise money for everyone who is in pain because of it also a seminar to clear up any questions
  6. Yes, I think that we should concentrate on the after school programs the most because they are in session when the highest percentage of teen violence occurs.
  7. I believe that by taking terrorism so seriously we are only helping Osama to his goal of disorder.
  8. We should hold discussion groups online or over the mail or through internet. We should not shun the subject of terrorism but not totally talk about it all the time!!
  9. What about terrorism in schools!
  10. Usually the younger kid gets the worst.
  11. Try this, have the younger kids teach things to the older kids! The younger kids gain confidence, and I think the older kids would get a good message out of this.
  12. Mobilize youth in the community by giving them the opportunity to serve.  LET THEM BE THE SOLUTION
  13. I have no suggestions.
  14. A lot of the suggestions on how to better our communities on the threat of terrorism are great, but to foster patriotism is what leads to the problem of terrorism unless we know how to control its limits.  We shouldn’t make the threat of terrorism seem as if it is a part of our every day lives because that is exactly what terrorists want us to do.
  15. I think it would be good if people focused more on how to fix their own communities before some of the other things listed in the survey.
  16. We need to start focusing back on family goals of loving and caring for everyone I believe this will not only help reduce the chance that something like the 9/11 tragedies would happen again but also reduce the over all amount of teen crime in the nation and someday that will transform into reducing all violence in the nation.
  17. I think we should teach more tolerance in schools. After the attacks it seemed like we as Americans were back to our old ways of segregation and racial hate. Not every Muslim is a terrorist. Not every Black person is going to shoot you. Not every white male is a shooter. If we created groups that helped more than singled out certain groups of people then maybe as teenagers we will be more understanding to those who are different in ANY way. In America we have Freedom and that means we shouldn't be the ones who point the finger because we have 4 pointing right back at us.  www.nationalsave.org!
  18. The main thing that is needed is education about what is typically unknown to most Americans.  There needs to be educational sessions incorporated into the curriculum that allows for students to learn facts about foreign events routinely as opposed to being left completely in the dark.  This way, the students will know what is going on in the world around them and beyond.
  19. I think there should be more rallies/conventions in cities to promote patriotism and encourage citizens to participate more in their community and increase happiness and spirit.
  20. What can adults do to help improve the system besides make laws and implement them?
  21. Have a S.A.V.E. program which is students against violence everywhere.
  22. I think that even though terrorism is threatening our country at this time that other items need to be addressed on the subject of violence other than terrorism!
  23. We as youth need to work together to combat the problems of terrorism and all crimes. The youth voice needs to be heard and other youth need to hear our message. Adults need to begin to support and aid us in our efforts by providing the necessary funding for certain program ideas, initiatives and much more.
  24. Youth and adults need to realize that moving forward can only strengthen the future. Remaining still in the present and cause us to dwell too much on the past and create an unstable society.
  25. I think that they should concentrate more on after school programs for 5-12 grade school students.
  26. Listen to the youth

 


Homeland Security Recommendations

 

February 18, 2002

 

Christopher Furlow

Director State and Local Office of Homeland Security

The White House

 

DRAFT - Homeland Security Recommendations from the NCPC McGruff Ambassadors

 

1.       Schools will develop educational programs for all grade levels that provide in-depth knowledge of issues surrounding the threat of terrorism.

 

2.       Schools and communities will develop programs that foster patriotism and stimulate young Americans to participate in community service projects.

 

3.       All schools in the United States of America and its Territories will create safety and security councils that include students, teachers, administrators and parents for the purpose of implementing terrorism crisis plans.

 

4.       Schools will host regular awareness sessions for community members and youth that are directed toward educating the public about the changes happening in their state and nation regarding homeland security.

 

5.       Schools and community-based organizations will encourage the media to concentrate on reporting positive activities and events taking place in the nation.  Promote positive human interest stories to uplift people spirits. 

 

6.       State and local government entities will encourage families to develop emergency preparedness and communication plans that focus on the basics of safety, encourage patriotism and promote family values.

 

7.       Schools will create student support groups that include trusted and caring adults to help deal with the threat of terrorism.

 

8.       Schools and community-based organizations will encourage the establishment of discussion groups utilizing highly experienced professionals to educate teens on issues surrounding terrorism in America.

 

9.       Schools and community-based organizations will create peer education groups that focus on how to deal with terrorism.

 

10.   Schools will create programs for high school students to mentor younger students on how to understand and cope with the threat of terrorism.

 

11.   Schools and community-based organizations will encourage and promote curriculum and activities that promote religious and cultural tolerance and understanding.

 

12.   Schools and communities will establish mentoring programs in law enforcement, fire, civil preparedness, and emergency medicine to encourage students to volunteer in and around the needs of homeland security.

 

Policy Recommendations (as delivered to Mr. Christopher Furlow, Homeland Security Office)

 

The following selected policy recommendations were developed by the 2002 McGruff Ambassadors utilizing a consensus model and collaborative group-decision technology donated by Teen Think Tanks of America, Incorporated. These recommendations address policy designed to prevent crime, violence, and substance abuse among youth. 

 

1.      Elected officials in federal, state, and local agencies will develop training initiatives to support positive interaction between law enforcement and youth.

 

2.      Federal, state, and local agencies will develop and provide resources to implement school security and safety programs that are established around a network of trust developed among youth, policy makers, law enforcement officials, business professionals, faith-based communities, and other adults.

 

3.      Federal, state, and local agencies will fund youth programs and extracurricular activities that create a positive environment for youth to grow and develop, enabling them to evolve into well adjusted law abiding citizens.

 

4.      The federal government will create stronger restrictions for producers and distributors of entertainment containing explicit lyrics, violent ideas, and derogatory language. This prevents impressionable minds from having their judgment obscured by these unpleasant depictions of life.

 

5.      Federal, state, and local agencies will provide resources to develop new and support existing community action programs that encourage youth and adult collaborations.

 

6.      Federal, state, and local government will develop public awareness programs that encourage community activism at the grass roots level.  These programs will promote activism as a way of life.

 

7.      To prevent identity crime on the Internet, federal, state, and local governments will establish strict policies to eliminate the opportunities for people to create an alternate persona. These policies will be congruent in each of the states.

 

8.      Federal, state, and local government will establish appropriate regulations such as parental controls and website ratings that govern Internet providers.

 

9.      Federal and state agencies will provide Public Service Announcements and media programs that are direct and informative to youth and result in increased awareness of the dangers of abusing illegal substances.

 

10.  Local agencies will reward and recognize youth for peer-to-peer education on the dangers of substance abuse.

 

11.  Congress will expand the scope of the National Youth Service Day to provide more opportunities to recognize youth who are sending positive messages throughout their schools, communities, and states. This day will shift the perception of youth as perpetrators of crime to the reality that youth are a positive force for crime prevention.

 

12.  All schools in the United States of America and its Territories will teach media literacy at all grade levels.  This will enable youth to understand and deconstruct media messages.        

 

13.  Federal, state, and local agencies in association with local schools will create opportunities to educate youth in the processes of developing public policy and laws by creating service programs that allow youth to work on political campaigns, participate in government meetings, and serve on boards as decision makers or process observers.

 

14.  Federal, state, and local legislative offices will implement the use of designated staff members to serve as youth-to-adult liaisons working directly with the youth constituency under their jurisdiction. Liaisons will work directly with youth and organized teen policy advisory boards to provide recommendations and input for youth-related public policies.

 

15.  Legislatures in each state will provide contact information specific to their state, county, and/or city jurisdictions that will serve as resources in schools and libraries for youth.

 

16.  Federal, state, and local legislators will establish mentor programs in their individual jurisdictions to develop relationships between professional policy makers and students.

 

The National Crime Prevention Council’s report of findings and recommendations from the 2002 National Youth Summit on Preventing Violence will provide more detailed information on the processes and results from this year’s summit.

 

The 2002 McGruff Ambassadors


 

Acknowledgements and Credits

 

 

Credits for the Teen Think Tanks of America, Inc.

 

The McGruff Ambassadors were the youth delegates charged with the responsibility of compiling and publishing the official report of findings and recommendations from the 2002 National Youth Summit on Preventing Violence. They deserve the lion’s share of credit for their serious engagement in this task, for their zeal and enthusiasm, for their innovative and fresh thinking about these issues, and for their dedication and long hours of effort to see the job done.

 

Teen Think Tanks of America, Inc. (TTT) and Collaborative Management Services, Inc. (CMSi) provided professional electronic facilitation support for the McGruff Ambassadors during their many deliberations to brainstorm and compile their official report.

 

We would like to thank the firms and organizations listed below who provided funds or other support to enable Teen Think Tanks of America, Inc. to do this unique and important work.

 

Brice Marsh, President of TTT, and Brian Boer, President of CMSi, both certified professional facilitators, facilitated the various sessions of the McGruff Ambassadors

 

Linda Bonner, Director of Marketing for United Way of Madison County, AL and Contract Grant Writer with Magnolia Enterprises, provided editorial support for the report while it was a work in progress.

 

CMSi  was engaged by Teen Think Tanks of America to provide a mobile collaborative group decision lab which enabled the Ambassadors to manage the organization and processing of information in their deliberations.

 

Sponsors:

 

Computer Sciences Corporation, El Secundo, CA and Falls Church, VA (for providing the booth and graphics for the TTT booth in Resource Alley and for funds to cover expenses.)

 

Redstone Federal Credit Union, Huntsville, AL (for funds to cover two-way shipping expenses for the portable computer lab from San Ramon, CA.)

 

Collaborative Management Services, Inc. (CMSi), San Ramon, CA (for providing the portable networked laptop computers and projectors for the Teen Think Tank activities, and for assistance with facilitation.)

 

GroupSystems.com, Tucson, AZ  (for providing a research license to use their GroupSystems software for collaboration and group decision support.)

 

State Farm Insurance Companies, Venice, FL (for funds to cover expense of printing brochures, flyers and posters.)

 

Endorsements and/or In Kind Donations

 

The American Legion, Madison, AL

 

United Way of Madison County, Alabama, Huntsville, AL

 

The American Legion Auxiliary, Huntsville, AL

 

The Huntsville Times, Huntsville, AL

 

Kinko's, Huntsville, AL (for providing the signs and banners for TTT.)

 

Knights of Columbus, North Alabama, Huntsville, AL (for financial support)

 

Other firms and individuals who preferred to remain unnamed.

 

 

Teen Think Tanks of America, Inc.

a 501(c)3 non-profit organization

www.teenthinktanks.org

 

"Giving Teens a Voice!"

 

Brice F. Marsh, President

Computer Scientist – Computer Sciences Corporation

Suite D102 #234

8000 Madison Blvd.

Madison, AL 35758

(800) 239-1314

(256) 508-9470 cell phone

(256) 772-3631  residence

(256) 544-4417  CSC work